Halloween Makeup Tips


Years of acting, theater arts, pageants and modeling and makeup is second nature for me. But it's not always intuitive for everyone. 

I'm going to share some awesome tips for Halloween that are easy to replicate and to take the concepts and make them your own!






I recommend a kit like this one above - a mix of every color of eyeshadow. It will do you well for Halloween, but there are tons of neutrals to use year-round. Makes it simple to travel too, only one eyeshadow kit to take with you!

I show you in this popular video how to make a simple bruise with eyeshadow only - 






I utilized a classic Halloween makeup kit (super cheap) to create a makeup eyepatch so I wouldn't bump into everyone all evening. I even took a small bit of the clown white to make dashes along the edges to look like sewn hems.

I suggest this one for ease of use - 







For the Frankenstein's bride (above), I drew a black eyeliner line around the throat. Then, I made slight bruising around it with red-brown eyeshadow on a damp brush. Then, with a fine brush, I dipped into the same shadow to make "X" stitches. I created sunken eyes with purple shadows. I made pale Victorian-looking grayish dead skin with a mix of foundation and gray shadow. I figured Dr. Frankenstein would try to make her look pretty by doing cheeks and lips red like a doll. 



There is no need to completely become the gillman if you want to be a mermaid. Simply take eyeshadows and a wet fine brush and create scales on your cheeks. Consider some minty eyeshadows or sparkling green shadows. You can still be pretty without being monstrous.



Take advantage of your coloring to create a spirit animal that you resemble. With big red hair and pale skin, the lion seemed an ideal choice for me. This was all done with those Halloween grease makeup pencils, but can use black shadow or pencil to give subtle hint of what you are without doing an entire face. 



My clown wouldn't be traditional. I used my belly dancing scarf I had around my shoulders. I got the wig at Goodwill for 1 dollar. The happy face for me had to be my bright happy colors and I don't like red, so went toward the citrus tones. Don't be afraid to take a traditional concept and make it your own.



For a full-face makeup job, start the base of it using the clown white mixed with foundation for a more stick-to-the-skin quality. For this witch, I simply made this face and wherever it formed creases, I used black pencil to define them more. Some blue under the eyes for that haggard look and ready to go!



This cracked baby doll was pretty standard. I did the white face, super big eyelashes with black pencil, red lips, and then used a black eyeliner pencil to create random cracks in the surface. I'd team with a short floral dress that looks rather baby doll. 







This steampunk ghost was a blast and the makeup meant very thick white base, dark red lips, and very dark smoky eyes. When you do something like this, remember it's not street makeup. You are going to have to make it look intensely too strong.

When all else fails, two things can become last-minute costumes. You can put on pajamas and a robe, surgical scrubs, a tennis outfit, whatever you want - and then make it a zombie of a vampire victim. 


In this one above - I put on a maid's costume and took a black eyeliner pencil to make two large dots in my neck, put some purple shadow bruising around them and then drips of blood to make a vampire victim. Add a pale face and you're good to go.

For a zombie - the makeup is about layering.


This gruesome one was actually easy. I put down a foundation with white and gray grease paint mixed in. I bruised under the eyes with some purple eyeshadow. I put elmer's glue on places I wanted dead skin. I let it dry completely. I peeled some of it back, using black eyeliner pencil under the skin to add depth, added some blood, and ready to go. 

Grab a bright eyeshadow kit and some greasepaint clown makeup and let your imagination guide your creation. There are lots of great vids on YouTube also.



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