Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Phantom Limb Syndrome: Phantom Body Syndrome



Humor me. I enjoy giving ya’all something to think about in the field of ghost hunting. I don’t think any knowledge is ever irrelevant and in the scheme of things, the more knowledge, the wider variety, the more it fits together. Here’s today’s point to ponder (and don’t be surprised if I leave you up in the air to think about it):

There’s a condition called “phantom limb syndrome” in which an amputee still feels the limb as if it were there, feels as if it’s moving, feels pain in it. This is believed to be the brain still receiving messages from the nerves that would carry impulses from the missing limb. If a person’s body still believes it extends beyond where it actually extends following surgery, it is because the mind and the nerves have not had time to catch up with this change. We use the term “phantom limb” in lots of ways in conversations and the concept is understood even to those who are not amputees. Mothers often report something similar following giving birth. People even report it after having an eye eviscerated or a breast removed in a mastectomy.

Next, imagine your day as it plays out right now. You’re half here, half in the future. You’re considering tomorrow and the next day, shoes laid out for the morning, vitamin container on the counter to remind you to stick to your new health regimen. You’re daydreaming about taking time off work to go fishing in two weeks, you’re considering how you’ll answer your boss when he approaches you tomorrow about a new task. There is a phantom part of you, your intention. It extends beyond you and into the next few minutes, the next hour, the next week, the next year. When a person’s life is cut short, where does that intention go, that forward thrust that has nothing to do with the physical limitations of your body and a lot to do with your purpose?

So, what does phantom limb syndrome have to do with phantom bodies?

Many people in the ghost hunting industry repeat the mantra “he haunts the place because he doesn’t know he’s dead.” Putting aside the concept of whether heaven would allow stragglers, let’s look at that concept more closely. Are they actually saying that this person died but their consciousness believes they still possess body?

Do they have a phantom body syndrome?

8 comments:

  1. Wow...I think you might be on to something there because it makes almost perfect sense, to me at least. I wouldn't be surprised if it has something to do with things on a quantum mechanical level, which perhaps might be the next area people should look into with ghost research.

    I've heard theories before that the brain/mind is a quantum receptor, which means there could be a chance it's quantum projector as well. So perhaps somehow when some people die, this receptor/projector manages to remain behind. If only I knew more about quantum physics I might be able to formulate this idea better lol!

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  2. Great post, you've got me thinking about this in a new way. This could explain why some hauntings happen. I'd like to learn more about this.
    I finally had a chance to go through my photos from the Stanley Hotel. I want to look at them again, because one photo had 2 orbs and I want to look more closely at them and then in another set of photos that were taking in succesion something appears on one of the photos. I can't make out what it is, but there is something there that doesn't appear in the photo before or in the photo after. And the 3 photos were taken within 2 seconds. I'll post them for your viewing and maybe you can have some input. Thanks for all your great posts. Sandra

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  3. Naveed;
    Yup--you're right! I almost want to go back to school and learn more about quantum physics, but I definitely believe that everything in the paranormal realm falls under its umbrella. I like your idea of a projector.

    Sandra;
    Glad you liked the post. I get off on strange tangents whenever I come across something that seems familiar/similar. I think it's the psychic in me looking for ties and connections, but I was typing up a report of someone with phantom limb syndrome and it just clicked for me. I can't wait to see your Stanley Hotel pic's!

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  4. Very thought-provoking. I remember seeing a Kirlian ("aura") photo of an amputee with phantom limb syndrome. You could actually see the aura of the missing hand. I saw it in some book years ago.

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  5. Gummer; You're right. I remember seeing the one where they cut the leaf and you could still see where the rest of the leaf had been. I think as a psychic that we reach out way past our bodies. In fact, every time we consider the past or the future, we're time travelling of a type.

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  6. Hi Great informative Blog! I would like to introduce Mirror Therapy to you. I am an advocate for Mirror Therapy and its use with Phantom Limb Syndrome. For more information or to buy a folding Mirror box visit www.reflexpainmanagement.com and also to a site we sponsor for Mirror Box Therapy www.mirrorboxtherapy.com.

    Thank you for more details:

    David Kitchenham
    Reflex Pain Management Ltd
    UK and Europe +44(0) 161 4086024
    US (347) 329-5416
    Mobile 07949100240

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  7. ...i'll be wondering about that for awhile..."does heaven allow stragglers?"...lol!

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  8. For mirror therapy to be most successful, it is best to go through the three stages of graded motor imagery. That is, laterality reconstruction (knowing your lefts from rights), motor imagery, and THEN Mirror Therapy.

    It has all been published at http://www.gradedmotorimagery.com.

    I know of a number of people who have been on the graded motor imagery programme with incredible success. I think it requires quite a bit of ‘brain training’ work which takes time but I know it is risk free and quite cheap.

    Another good Mirror Box movie is here: gradedmotorimagery.com/mirror.html
    Tom

    ReplyDelete

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